Why Leaders Eat Last

In this talk leadership expert Simon Sinek reveals the hidden dynamics that inspire leadership and trust. In biological terms, leaders get the first pick of food and other spoils, but at a cost. When danger is present, the group expects the leader to mitigate all threats even at the expense of their personal well-being. Understanding this deep-seated expectation is the key difference between someone who is just an “authority” versus a true “leader.”

Watch 45 video published by 99U

The 10 Biggest Questions We Have As People Managers

Buffer has a strong culture of nurturing people into more advanced roles and promoting from within. This is fabulous for the opportunities this affords to their teammates; however, it does lead to a steep learning curve with disciplines like strategy, vision, coaching, and mentorship that aren’t as big a part of an individual contributor role. This article is about the biggest questions Buffer had for Jason Evanish, the Founder of HR start-up Lighthouse, and the answers and ideas he shared with the Buffer team.

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Article by Kevan Lee on Open Buffer

Leaders Can Shape Company Culture Through Their Behaviors

Building culture begins with the behavior of the leaders in organizations. To say that another way, if you are interested in changing the culture of your organization, your first step should be to look in the mirror and make sure you are setting the kind of behavioral examples you want everyone else to follow.

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Article by Jim Whitehorse, CEO of Red Hat for HBR

Fighting Factions: How Startups Can Scale Without Mutiny

Alexander Grosse, Director of Engineering for BCG Digital Ventures, and David Loftesness, the Head of Platform at eero, have both lived through the brilliant and bleak moments of scaling teams. In this interview, they look at five areas where startups can either take action to deactivate destructive factionalism or even prevent them from forming in the first place. They share concrete processes for regaining the efficiency that leaders might not even realize they’re losing to competing mindsets and poor communication. Through these tactics, they show through specific scenarios why empathy is just as vital to a startup’s success as innovation.

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Article by First Round

The New Manager Death Spiral

As a new manager, you’re likely to want to prove yourself. So you work late, and you do your very best to kick ass and make a good first impression. This is the approach that worked well for you as an individual, so, of course, it’ll work when leading a team. This is where the Spiral begins because the initial thought is actually, “I can do it all myself. I’m the Boss.” But what you really need to learn to become is being a leader of your team, not the boss that’s in charge of making decisions for them.

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Article by Michael Lopp on Rands in Response

How Small Shifts In Leadership Can Transform Your Team Dynamic

Evidence shows colleagues will behave more like their best selves, more of the time, if leaders take a few modest steps to foster an environment where people’s brain’s aren’t overloaded—more focused on rewards than threats—and have their fundamental social needs met. With a little behavioral science in their toolkit, leaders can build a more productive team—and a happier one at that.

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Article by Carolin Webb for McKinsey Quarterly

The Five Dysfunctions Of A Team

Patrick Lencioni is the author of several bestselling books, including “The five dysfunctions of a team”. In this entertaining talk he speaks about the essential elements for high performing teams. I also highly recommend reading his book “The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything in Business” in which Patrick provides a foundational construct for conducting business in a way that maximizes human potential and aligns the organization around a common set of principles.

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The Woman Who Built Netflix’s Culture Did It With These 5 Things In Mind

Netflix and Patty McCord are famous for what Sheryl Sandberg called “the most important document ever to come out of the Valley”. It’s is a 124-page presentation about company culture that’s been shared almost 16 million times on Slideshare, called the “Netflix Culture: Freedom & Responsibility”.  The document is an essential read for everyone interested in building high-performance organizational cultures. Read the slides as well as this article, which outlines the essence and mindsets that build the DNA for Netflix’s way of running their organization.

Read on Article by Vivian Giang on LinkedIn Talent Blog >>

Managers… How Much Justice Is Enough?

Promotion and adherence to justice seems to translate into beneficial workplace behaviors such as task performance and organizational citizenship behavior because fair treatment from managers may deepen employees trust, commitment, sense of being supported, and the quality of work relationships. The research brought forward in this piece suggests that living up to fair managerial behavior may be a cost-effective means to higher employees’ productivity.

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Article by Pietro Marenco on ScienceForWork

How To Start A Cultural Revolution, Keynote By Ben Horowitz

How should founders building companies (or leaders trying to turn their company around, address disruption, beat competition, and so on) go about creating a true winning culture? Horowitz shares key takeaways from the only successful slave revolution in the history of humanity — the Haitian revolution led by Toussaint L’Ouverture in 1791 — in this keynote at Startup Grind.

Watch 32 min video