Organizational Culture – Who Owns It, Business Or Human Resources?

HR has a major role in enabling the business to live (or change) its culture by supporting it with the appropriate tools, systems and processes, and when needed – professional expertise…but in essence, it’s all about how the people in an organization are nurtured and led. Therefore, it is essential that the business owns a company’s culture – this is especially true when a company decides to change its culture.

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Written by Jerry Pico

5 Influences On Organizational Culture To Be Aware Of

Organizational culture should be the vision you have for your company, but this is not always the case. Without direction and positive influences, negative factors can take hold, shaping a company’s culture in a way that can become harmful to the business.

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Written by Steffen Maier, published on LinkedIn

How We Conduct 1:1s

Leaders must routinely spend time with each members of their team to discuss what they’re working on and how to improve. This infographic by NOBL Collective distills a handful of practices from leading teams, scientific research, and the observations on how to effectively have 1:1s.

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Published by NOBL Collective

High-Performing Teams Need Psychological Safety

Creating psychological safety in a team drives higher levels of engagement, increased motivation to tackle difficult problems, more learning and development opportunities, and better performance. This article outlines how to build it.

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Written by Laura Delizionna, published by HBR

Building A Resilient Organizational Culture

While human resilience may be thought of as a personality trait, in the aggregate, groups, organizations, and even communities can learn to develop a “culture of resilience” which manifests itself as a form of “psychological immunity” to, or the ability to rebound from, the untoward effects of adversity.

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Written by George S. Everly, published by HBR

Organizational Health: A Fast Track To Performance Improvement

McKinsey research promotes that the best way to run a business is to balance short-term performance and long-term health. Healthy companies dramatically outperform their peers. The proof for it is strong—the top quartile of publicly traded companies in McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index (OHI) delivers roughly three times the returns to shareholders as those in the bottom quartile.

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Published by McKinsey Quarterly

Having Good 1:1s With Your People – The Update, The Vent, and The Disaster

Having a meaningful conversation with anyone takes time. The job of people leaders in  a 1:1 is to give the smallest voice a chance to be heard.  A good start a conversation is with a simple question.

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Written by Michael Lopp

Why Company Culture Is Crucial

Dharmesh Shah, co-founder and CTO at the marketing and sales software firm HubSpot, distills the company’s 128-slide presentation on company culture down to its essence, describing it as a business’s “operating system” that lets people do their best work. Shah says entrepreneurs must create a company culture they love, because one will eventually emerge no matter what.

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To Be A Disrupter, You Don’t Have To Be An Asshole

Steve Jobs was a great role model for many things. Original thinking and nonconformity. Seeing the future more clearly than others and working relentlessly to create that future. Obsession with beautiful design and quality. Building a world-class tech company without knowing how to code. That doesn’t mean he was a great role model for how to treat others. Disrupters are often disagreeable. But you can be disagreeable without being an asshole.

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Written by Adam Grant, published on LinkedIn

How To Go From 1 Million To 100 Million

Gary Vaynerchuk builds businesses. Fresh out of college he took his family wine business and grew it from a $3M to a $60M business in just five years. Now he runs VaynerMedia, one of the world’s hottest digital agencies. Along the way he became a prolific angel investor and venture capitalist, investing in companies like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Uber, and Birchbox before eventually co-founding VaynerRSE, a $25M angel fund. Here’s is personal insight on how to grow a business from $1 Million to $100 Million.

1 Min video, published by Gary Vaynerchuk